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No. 51 (June 1965)
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These questions, framed by a Maori member of The Maori Education Foundation Board, are re-printed from the Foundation's last Annual Report.

If You are a Pakeha
Ask Yourself
These Questions

1.

Is my attitude to the Maori people positive and friendly? Am I making any attempt, even if only by reading, to get to know them and their way of life better?

2.

Have I personally helped any Maori?

3.

What have I done to strengthen confidence and friendship between our two peoples? Have I any Maori friends? Have I ever been in a Maori home, or had a Maori in mine?

4.

If I have any Maori employees, what positive steps have I taken to make sure they are happy and efficient? Do I understand a Maori's compulsion to attend a tangi? Have I adjusted my work methods to take advantage of the Maori's joy in group and team work? Am I concerned about their living conditions? Have I instituted any savings scheme?

5.

What have I done to provide more vocational opportunities for Maori youth?

6.

Have I made any real endeavour to encourage Maori membership in any church, educational, cultural, or sporting organisation to which I belong?

7.

Have I any idea of the underlying causes of Maori delinquency? Is our handling of the Maori delinquent effective?

8.

If one Maori lets you down, do you tend to condemn the whole race?

9.

Social integration, which is one of the foundations of good race relations, has not really made much progress in New Zealand. Have I accepted my responsibility in this matter?

 

If You are a Maori
Ask Yourself
These Questions

1.

Is my attitude to the Pakeha positive and friendly? Am I making any attempt to get to know them and their way of life better?

2.

Have I personally helped (or been helped by) any Pakeha?

3.

What have I done to strengthen confidence and friendship between our two peoples? Have I ever been in a Pakeha home, or had a Pakeha in mine?

4.

If I have a Pakeha employer and colleagues, what positive steps have I taken to form a good work relationship with them? Do I understand their attitudes to my wishing to attend a tangi or hui? Do I appreciate the advantages (and disadvantages) of adjusting to the Pakeha's competitive and individualistic work methods? If my living conditions are unsatisfactory, what can I do (have I done) to improve them? Have I joined any savings scheme?

5.

What have I done to encourage young Maoris to avail themselves of educational and vocational opportunities offering? Am I sufficiently aware of the opportunities offering so that I may guide my children?

6.

Have I made any real endeavour to encourage Pakeha membership in any Maori organisation to which I belong?

7.

Have I any idea of the underlying causes of Maori delinquency? Am I satisfied that the handling of Maori delinquents is effective? If not, what have I done (can I do) about it?

8.

If one Pakeha lets you down, do you tend to condemn them all?

9.

Social integration, which is one of the foundations of good relations, has not really made much progress in New Zealand. Have I accepted my responsibility in this matter?

 
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10.

Am I prepared to assist Maori university students to get good accommodation? Have I a spare room in my home which could be put to better use?

11.

Do I take any personal interest in the Maori clubs in my district?

12.

Have I appreciated that the situation is not one that can be eased off our consciences by money alone?

 
10.

Am I concerned that Maori students and apprentices get good accommodation? What have I done (can I do) to ensure that they do?

11.

Do I take any active interest in the Pakeha organisations in my district?

12.

Have I appreciated that the situation is not one that can be righted on the economic level alone?

The personal contribution of each of us towards mutual understanding is imperative and will return immense dividends and great personal satisfaction.

A group of German students who are studying Maori life and culture would like to exchange letters with a Maori correspondent or correspondents. They understand English and Esperanto. Their address is:

Mr Hans Zeilinger,

Bundesleitung Deutsche Esperanto-Jugend,

851 Furth i. Bay.,

Herrnstr. 58, GERMANY.

The twin daughters of Mr and Mrs W. Walker, of Dannevirke, members of Ngati Kahungunu, were married last February at a double wedding at Dannevirke. Tui Victoria married Mr William Rapira, a son of Mr and Mrs Daniel Rapira of Auckland; Kura Judith married Robert Smith, a son of Mr and Mrs Jim Harama, jnr., of Hokianga. Both their husbands belong to Ngapuhi.